Glenville

In the early 1800s the hum of industry was loud in Glenville, for water power furnished excellent mill sites on the north town-line of King Township at the 3rd concession, one and one-quarter miles west of the present town boundary of Newmarket. Glenville was named, no doubt, on account of its location, for the hamlet was folded in by hills.  Among early settlers in this rolling country the following names are notable: Bolton, Black, Webster, Brodie, Graham, Hodgins, Sharpe, Doan, Wray, Rogers, Sommerville, Homers, Muns and Pottage.  In 1807, Glenville had a sawmill located on the south pond.  In addition there was a flour and lumber mill, three blacksmiths, blanket and carpet making establishment, a church, store, school and Temperance Society.  In 1900 a post office opened in the grist mill with the miller Samuel Waldock as postmaster.  When he resigned in 1905, Frank H. Robinson became postmaster until 1914 when rural mail delivery was introduced to the district.  The original Glenville school was built in 1839 on the southwest corner of the Rogers farm.  It was later moved to a new location near the mill. In 1885, a new school was built on the crest of a nearby hill and continued to serve the section until 1953 when the pupil’s were transferred to the new Kettleby School.  The Glenville school was sold and converted to a private residence. 

Glenville
Photo from Album of Oldies, Elizabeth McClure Gillham

 

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